Unity Web Player

Place to put all your questions, place to get the answers. 【・ヘ・?】This can have both forum-related questions and game-related questions.
- Accelevi
Forum rules
Forget-me-not.

Re: Unity Web Player

Postby dyearn » Fri Nov 22, 2013 2:57 am

Same thing happened to me yesterday, i noticed there is few ppl having this problem as well...somehow now it works fine
dyearn
 

 

Re: Unity Web Player

Postby Fuginotory » Thu Nov 28, 2013 9:15 am

You guys, this most often happens due to system overheat, you should clear your cashe frequently, use fullscreen or disable other visual themes you may have on while playing. When the video gets too hot its performance is lowered, and DX doesn't work properly, that is why waiting helps, because it gives it time to cool off. The best fix is getting better cooling for your computer. When it tells you that you need DX compatible video, that means it was probably disabled temporarily due to heat issues. You can check if this is the case trough the task manager, just keep an eye on the temperature.

If the issue is not heat, then you should take a look at your drivers and DX version, and weather or not the version of DX you are using is compatible with your drivers and video, if something is off there, you are going to have a bad time. If you are not sure how to do this yourself, you should probably ask a friend to help you out. I generally advise people not to mess with their settings unless they know what they are doing, because they might accidentally mess something up.

I myself have been having overheat issues with games, and I hate it.
Fuginotory
 

Re: Unity Web Player

Postby Accelevi » Thu Nov 28, 2013 2:04 pm

I have no idea, but what's the average good temperature?
Image

Sig courtesy of Zarythe <3

C A D E A U X
User avatar
Accelevi
« Administrator »
 
Posts: 13049
Joined: Tue Aug 06, 2013 6:59 pm

Re: Unity Web Player

Postby Fuginotory » Thu Nov 28, 2013 4:19 pm

Well, idle temp should be about 30-35C id you're using air cooling and at standard room temp. Under load (while gaming and such) it really shouldn't exceed 50C, and if it gets anywhere near 65C then you should know that you are approaching the upper safe limit and are about to set yourself on fire. When you approach 65C, your PC will get slower, you are likely to get the BSOD, you can expect crashes and generally a bad life experience, if you reach 70C your PC will shut itself down. Typically my PC runs between 35C and 45C when under load, and gets a lot cooler when idle because at home we keep the rooms colder then most.

There are a few ways you can check your PC temp:

1. Reboot your computer: Typically BIOS comes with a built in hardware monitor. When you reboot, at the time your computer first boots up, you need to press the BIOS key. The key varies depending on the hardware manufacturer, but typically that key is either F2, F10 or Delete, if you are not sure, you can see it one the same screen that shows the manufacturer logo. If you miss the moment for pressing the key, you have to reboot again, and try again. If you are running Windows 8, you can access the BIOS by selecting the restart function from the menu, while holding shift.
When you are in the BIOS, select the "PC Health Status" and it will display your CPU temp control, your system temp, your fan RPM, as well as voltage and such.

2. Use Hardware monitoring software: If you don't really feel confident enough to mess around with BIOS or, like me, you just don't want to bother, then you should just get hardware monitoring software. What program you use is your own choice. A few programs I can think of right now are Speedfan, Open Hardware Monitor, Core Temp, Real Temp and HWmonitor. I use HWmonitor. Compare the results shown by the program to the recommended values in the documentation you received when you both your PC components.

If your PC is in fact overheating, you can try to lighten its load by removing unneeded themes and effects, and generally simplifying all processes, not running too many processes at the same time etc...

Some real solutions:

Clean out and dust the inside of your computer: if dust clogs up everything, air can't flow around the inside and cool your components, meaning that they will overheat.

Apply new thermal paste: Thermal paste is what conducts heat from your PC to your heatsink, but with time it deteriorates, and new paste needs to be applied, check to see if that time has come for your PC, and do it if you need to, your PC will thank you for it. Don't overdo it! If you've never done it before then ask someone to help you, or at least to explain to you what to do, so you don't accidentally do more harm then good.

Replace/Upgrade cooling: If your PC is constantly overheating, there is a chance your cooling may no longer be up to par, in which case it should be replaced. Add more case fans, replace heatsink, the works. Don't overdo it, it's not good to have your system run too cold. It's best to get a professional opinion if it comes to this.

Replace hardware components: Old components tend to start overheating after being used for a long time, when this time comes it is best to replace them, otherwise they will start burning out eventually. If your Motherboard is the one giving you grief, you may want to consider rebuilding your whole system because you'll have to reinstall everything anyway, and if your motherboard is gone, chances are the older components will not be up to par with a new motherboard.
Last edited by Fuginotory on Thu Nov 28, 2013 4:27 pm, edited 1 time in total.
Fuginotory
 

Re: Unity Web Player

Postby Khally » Thu Nov 28, 2013 4:23 pm

Awesome post there :)

(of course, bear in mind, this is for desktop computers, not laptops)
Khally
 

Re: Unity Web Player

Postby Fuginotory » Thu Nov 28, 2013 4:33 pm

Yes, PC only! If you are using a laptop, my advice is to dump it and get a PC. If you can't live without a laptop then you can check your heat, make sure you don't keep in on a blanket while playing, or using it altogether, because the blanket will help it heat up faster. Don't keep it on your knees, thighs and whatever, your body emits heat, and your clothes insulate, it may overheat. Best just place your laptop on a table and leave it there while you go to the nearest computer store and buy a PC. If you really must insist on using a laptop then you can check these things and if it is overheating, take it to a computer store so they can clean it for you, and check if everything is working properly. Don't try to fix it yourself unless you are a computer wizz because, chances are that you will just wreck it... Which might be good because then you can actually get a PC, and forget the horror inflicted upon your life by the laptop.
Fuginotory
 

Re: Unity Web Player

Postby Accelevi » Thu Nov 28, 2013 6:11 pm

Lol, I can't imagine trying to play on a tiny laptop.
Image

Sig courtesy of Zarythe <3

C A D E A U X
User avatar
Accelevi
« Administrator »
 
Posts: 13049
Joined: Tue Aug 06, 2013 6:59 pm

Re: Unity Web Player

Postby Annie Leonhardt » Sat Nov 30, 2013 10:19 pm

So this was only a temporary problem?
Annie Leonhardt
 

Re: Unity Web Player

Postby Fuginotory » Sat Nov 30, 2013 11:58 pm

No, if the problem is indeed overheating, it will not go away unless you do something about it.
Fuginotory
 

Re: Unity Web Player

Postby Annie Leonhardt » Sun Dec 01, 2013 4:25 pm

The problem wasn't from me. I tested another games that are in Unity and it worked.
Annie Leonhardt
 

PreviousNext

Return to Help Section

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 1 guest

cron